Berkeley Progressive Alliance

Election Results – Progressive Wins in Berkeley

jesse-speaking-with-candidates

Arreguín Elected Mayor; Bartlett, Hahn, CALI Slate Win

While thousands of vote by mail ballots remain to be counted, it is clear that Jesse Arreguín has been elected mayor of Berkeley by large margin. His convincing 47% to 34% margin over District 5 council member Laurie Capitelli is too large to be affected by counting of additional ballots.

Similarly, Sophie Hahn has a commanding lead over Capitelli-endorsed Stephen Murphy for the District 5 Council seat and Ben Bartlett has a very solid lead in District 3 over Mark Coplan and Deborah Mathews who are running neck and neck for second place.

This is the biggest progressive electoral victory in many years. There will be a special election for Jesse Arreguín’s District 4 Council seat. If a progressive wins, Jesse will have four allies on the Council and may have a fifth depending on the outcome in District 2. It’s too bad that this comes with a disastrous presidential election result.

District 2: It ain’t over – still a tight race: In District 2, the initial ranked choice count gives Cheryl Davila a narrow 42 vote lead over incumbent council member Darryl Moore. It’s 1838 to 1796, or 50.6% to 49.4%. Darryl had 40% of the first choice votes. Nanci Armstrong-Temple is finishing third so far with 1116 votes, only 82 votes behind Cheryl Davila. When Nanci’s votes were apportioned, 640 went to Davila and 245 to Moore (231 did not make a second choice). As counting continues, Moore could regain the lead; it’s also possible that Armstrong-Temple could overtake Davila for second place, in which case Davila’s second choice votes would be apportioned.

CALI slate sweeps Rent Board: The gap between Igor Tregub, now in fourth place and Judy Hunt, the landlord-backed incumbent, who was the only elected official in Berkeley to opposed affordable housing measure U1, is over 2,500 votes, large enough to ensure victory for Tregub even with thousands of vote by mail and provisional ballots to be counted.

Measure U1, aka the Landlord Tax, has won easily despite the BPOA’s $800,000+ campaign against it. It currently has 74.1% of the vote.

See below for more details on the Candidate results and local measures. All counts are as of 1:40 a.m. November 9. The next update will be Friday at 4:30pm. The County will continue updating over the next week or so until all ballots are counted. Check here for more:  http://www.acgov.org/rov/current_election/230/index.htm

Candidate Results Details

Mayor  Winner with ballots counted so far: JESSE ARREGUIN
First Choice votes

Jesse Arreguín 15,885 votes (47.44%)    51.84% with ranked choice

Laurie Capitelli 11,262 votes (33.64%)
Kriss Worthington    2,816 votes (8.41%)
Bernt Wahl       952 votes (2.84%)
Ben Gould   937 votes(2.80%)
Zachary Runningwolf    881 votes (2.63%)
Mike Lee       508 votes (1.52%)
Naomi Pete       225 votes (0.67%)
Ranked choice result: Jesse at 51.84%, after second choice votes of others were counted; Kriss second choice votes were not needed. These results will update as remaining ballots are counted, but there is no likelihood that Jesse won’t win. http://www.acgov.org/rov/rcv/results/230/rcvresults_6767.htm
District 2 City Council   Winner with ballots counted so far: CHERYL DAVILA  50.58% with ranked choice
Darryl Moore   1,545 (40.0%)
Cheryl Davila 1,194 (30.9%)
Nanci Armstrong Temple    1,115 (28.9.%)
Ranked choice result:  Cheryl Davila with 50.58% when Nanci’s second choice ballots were counted; this is close; could change when additional ballots are counted. http://www.acgov.org/rov/rcv/results/230/rcvresults_6868.htm
District 3 City Council
Ben Bartlett 2260   56.9%
Deborah Matthews  81320.5%
Mark Coplan   812 20.5%
Al Murray      81    2.0%
District 5 City Council
Sophie Hahn 3451 61.9%
Stephen Murphy 2122 38.1%
District 6 City Council
Susan Wengraf 2683 60.7%
Fred Dodsworth 1186 26.8%
Isabelle Gaston   553 12.5%
Rent Board  Winners: all members of CALI slate; no chance that further results will change this.
Leah Simon Weisberg 17,275 votes
Alejandro Soto-Vigil 17,201 votes
Christina Murphy 16,853 votes
Igor Tegub   14,691 votes
Judy Hunt 12,111 votes
Nate Wollman   8,158 votes

 

9th State Senate District: Nancy Skinner is way ahead of Sandre Swanson in the Alameda County portion of the district, 60.6% to 39.4%; it’s 63-37 in the district as a whole.

Berkeley School Board: the two incumbents, Judy Appel (22,967 votes) and Beatriz Leyva-Cutler (17,336) were easily re-elected over challenger Abdur Sikder (4552 votes).

Local Measures Results

E-1, BSEP, parcel tax for schools, YES 30,204 votes, 88.3%

U1, tax on big landlords for affordable housing YES  24,394 votes,  74.1%  (not so different from 76.2% for the soda tax in 2014)

DD, phony landlord sponsored alternative to U1, NO  22,810 votes, 70.8% (that’s the NOs)

T1, Bond measure for infrastructure, parks, senior centers YES 28,865,  86,5%

X1, Public Financing of Elections for Mayor and Council YES  19,356 votes, 64.2%

Y1, 16-17 year olds vote for School Board YES, 21,518, 68.5%

AA, regulating owner move in evictions, YES 22,309 votes, 72.3%

BB, minimum wage $15 in 2019, NO 20,789 votes, 66.0%

CC, minimum wage $15 in 2017, NO 20,573 votes, 65.9%

A1, County Bond for affordable housing, YES  264,499, countywide votes, 72.3%

CI, AC Transit parcel tax, YES, 190,019 votes in the district, 81.9%

RR, BART bond, YES, 253,175 votes, 70.9%

–by Rob Wrenn

Other Election Results:

In other local election news, measures initiated by citizens to establish rent control programs appeared headed for victory in Richmond and Mountain View but were losing in Alameda, San Mateo and Burlingame. Similarly, soda tax measures were headed to victory in Bay Area cities, with all precincts reporting. The measures, on the ballot in San Francisco, Oakland and the East Bay suburb of Albany, place a penny-per-ounce tax on sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages.

Richmond’s Measure M, a new property progressive transfer tax, did not pass. Seventy percent of voters said ‘No’ to the little-discussed ballot measure.

BPA Local & Regional Ballot Measure Endorsements, Endorsements of Regional Candidates

Ballot Measures

Renewal of BSEP School Tax     Berkeley Measure E-1–YES: This tax was first passed by Berkeley voters in 1986 (Measure C).  Berkeley Schools Excellence Program (BSEP) revenues in 2014-15 totaled  about $25 million, representing about 20% of the budget. It requires a two-thirds vote to pass. Things it funds include school libraries, music programs, and support for struggling students. Crucially it helps fund enough teachers to keep class sizes small. It would be a disaster for the schools if the tax were not renewed. More info: http://www.bsep2016.org

Tax on larger landlords for affordable housing   Berkeley Measure U-1–YES YES YES, Berkeley Measure DD —NO NO NO NO:  Measure U1 increases the business license tax on owners of five or more units. It would generate about $4 million annually in new revenue for affordable housing.  The Housing  Advisory Committee would advise the City Council on how to spend the money and would track how it’s used. Over time revenues would increase as the tax is applied to newer housing. The revenues generated could help fund as many as 40 affordable units per year, and more in later years.Don’t be fooled by deceptive mailers from the BPOA supporting Measure DD, which features a much smaller tax increase that would fund many fewer units and would not exempt smaller landlords. Vote YES ON U1; vote NO on phony DD.  U1 is fairly complicated; more info here: http://www.fundaffordablehousing.org

Public Financing of Elections for Mayor and Council –Berkeley Measure X-1–YES: This measure would reduce the influence of special interest contributions and
outside money in our local elections. Candidates who reject money from special
interest PACs and accept contributions of only $50 or less would receive matching funds.
This is important as it would help progressive candidates be competitive in races
where their major opponents are often receive money from special interests. For more info: http://www.yesonx1.org

Rent Stabilization Board Amendment on Evictions – Berkeley Measure AA–YES: Will prohibit owner move-in evictions of families with children during the academic year;
increases the amount of relocation assistance for owner move-in evictions to $15,000
since moving in Berkeley is very expensive. There is no organized opposition to this measure.

Minimum wage measures – Berkeley Measure BB–NO NO NO, Berkeley Measure CC–NO NO NO: Supporters of both BB and CC reached a compromise and both have withdrawn
support for their respective measures. The City Council voted unanimously to adopt
an ordinance that will increase the minimum wage so that it reaches $15.00 an
hour in October 2018. For the details: https://berkeleyprogressivealliance.org/2016/09/25/how-the-15-minimum-wage-was-won-in-berkeley-the-details-back-story/

 Affordable Housing Bond – Alameda County Measure A-1–YES: Most of the money from this bond will go to creation and preservation of  affordable rental housing. Also includes down payment assistance loans  for middle income working families loans to help disabled, seniors and other low-income homeowners to remain in their homes.  Berkeley would get upwards of $15.8 million from this bond. More info: http://www.affordablealameda.com

AC Transit Funding – Alameda County Measure C-1–YES:  This would extend the existing parcel tax to maintain essential bus service for the East Bay. Revenues for this tax are essential for maintaining bus service in Berkeley and in neighboring cities served by AC Transit. For more info: http://www.transformca.org/transform-blog-post/keep-ac-transit-affordable-and-reliable-vote-yes-measure-c1

BART Bond Measure–YES on RR: To rebuild BART to make it safer and more reliable. Will fund new train cars,  replace worn track, make earthquake safety and structural repairs, new maintenance facilities to keep the maximum number of trains in operation, a modernized train control system to reduce waiting and delays. More info: http://www.yesforbart.com. Also click here: http://www.transformca.org/transform-blog-post/transform-endorses-barts-2016-funding-measure

Regional Candidates

Peralta Colleges Board Area 4 –  Nicky Gonzalez Yuen: Nicky has spearheaded  the Peralta District’s Environmental Sustainability policies and deserves re-election. In addition he has been active locally in efforts to increase the minimum wage and has
endorsed Jesse Arreguin for mayor of Berkeley and the CALI Rent Board slate. More info: http://nickygy.org

BART Board of Directors, District  – Lateefah Simon: A BART rider, Lateefah is running against an incumbent who has adopted an anti-union stance and was the only BART director to vote against the contract settlement with BART unions in 2014. Lateefah is endorsed by the Sierra Club. More info: http://www.lateefahforbart.com

How the $15 Minimum Wage Was Won in Berkeley – the Details & Back Story

Faced with a citizen ballot measure on November’s ballot, on August 31, the Berkeley City Council unanimously voted for to increase the minimum wage in Berkeley to $15 an hour on October 1, 2018.

Progressive Councilmember and mayoral candidate Jesse Arreguin has been a leader in the effort to raise the minimum wage. In 2013, he was one of the sponsors of the Council item referring an increased minimum wage to the Labor Commission.

Jesse’s opponent for mayor, Laurie Capitelli, delayed action to achieve the $15 wage. In May 2014, he reneged on promises made to community members who have worked tirelessly for a higher minimum wage.  In September, 2015 he again voted against a proposal to raise the minimum wage to $15 in 2018, while Jesse Arreguin and Council progressives voted for it. This year, he supported an alternative ballot measure that would have delayed the increase to $15 and added loopholes and exceptions. Finally, when it was too late to take the competing measures off the ballot, he and his council allies decided to join progressives on the council and action was finally taken to bring the minimum wage to $15.  Only with extensive citizen pressure and lobbying did he (and his Council allies) do so.

Berkeley is now one of four Bay Area cities that will achieve the $15 minimum wage for all employees, regardless of the size of the business, in 2018.

City When $15 takes effect
Mountain View January 1, 2018
San Francisco and Emeryville July 1, 2018
Berkeley October 1, 2018
El Cerrito January 1, 2019

Berkeley’s minimum wage will be $12.53 effective October 1 this year, rise to $13.75 on in October, 2017 and then to $15 in October, 2018. The ordinance mandates sick leave, with a cap of 48 hours for employers of fewer than 25 workers and 72 hours from larger employers, starting right away.

As a result of this compromise, the Berkeley Progressive Alliance has withdrawn its support for Measure CC, the citizen measure.

 

San Francisco Leads the Way

In 2003, San Francisco voters approved Proposition L, establishing an indexed minimum wage beginning at $8.50 an hour.  By 2014, San Francisco’s minimum wage was $10.74 an hour, the highest in the United States. In 2014, faced with a ballot initiative backed by unions and activists to raise the minimum wage to $15 by 2017, a compromise initiative was placed on the ballot to raise it to $15 in 2018, with future inflation increases. The measure passed with 77% of the vote.

 

Berkeley: First Steps 

Councilmember Worthington first referred a Berkeley minimum wage to the Labor Commission in 2004. The Commission created a Minimum Wage and Living Wage subcommittee, but no proposal emerged and the Council took no further action.

Efforts to enact a minimum wage were revived in 2013 by advocates, including Nicky Gonzalez Yuen, Wendy Bloom and Ellen Widess. In April, 2013 Mayor Bates and progressive council members Arreguin and Worthington asked city staff and the Labor Commission to draft an ordinance similar to San Francisco’s.[1]

 

The Labor Commission proposal

In April, 2014, the Labor Commission proposed, effective June, 2014, a $10.74/hour minimum wage for most employers and $13.34/hour for large employers,[2]  essentially adopting San Francisco’s minimum wage . Annual increases based on the Consumer Price Index[3]  would continue until the minimum wage equaled the living wage. Beginning June, 2015, a health care requirement would have been in place.

The proposal would have established the highest minimum wage in the country.

At a May 1, 2014 Council meeting, Councilmember Capitelli proposed slowing the Labor Commission proposal; only in 2020, would the minimum wage equal Berkeley’s living wage, estimated at a bit higher than $15.00 an hour.

 

Capitelli Reneges

At a May 6 Council meeting, Capitelli outraged minimum wage supporters by reneging on his proposal. The Council instead passed the first reading of an ordinance increasing the minimum wage to $10 in January, 2015 and $10.75 in January, 2016. A Council task force would be formed to consider what should happen after that. Effectively, had this been adopted, Berkeley would have been two years behind San Francisco and Oakland.

Capitelli’s broken promise and the Council’s vote on May 6 provoked a firestorm of protest from citizens. Berkeley Citizens for a Fair Minimum Wage announced their intention to place a $15 minimum wage on the ballot. Former city councilmembers Carla Woodworth and Ying Lee and activists Margot Smith, Marty Schiffenbauer and David Fielder signed a letter to the City Clerk indicating their support.

 

Efforts by Councilmembers Anderson, Arreguin, Moore and Worthington to increase the minimum wage further after 2016 were rejected by Councilmember Capitelli and a majority of his colleagues. Instead, the Council decided to raise the minimum wage to $12.53 an hour by October 2016 with a one-year exemption for non-profits and a permanent exemption for youth in job training.

 

Stalling and Delays Continue – Activists Keep Pushing

In June 2014, the Council discussed but dropped the idea of having a Minimum Wage Task Force. In September 2014, the Council directed the Labor Commission to come back with additional minimum wage and sick leave recommendations.

After a year spent drafting a new ordinance with business, labor, community and Council member input, on September 15, 2015, the Labor Commission presented a new proposal to the Council. It included bringing the minimum wage to a living wage; cost of living increases; paid sick leave; service charge rules, and clarification/ removal of exemptions.

Progressive Councilmembers Worthington and Anderson made a series of motions, all of which failed, to increase the minimum wage. One would have raised the minimum wage to $15 on October 1, 2018, the same amount that the Council ultimately agreed to. It was supported by Councilmembers Anderson, Arreguin, Moore and Worthington, but opposed by Mayor Bates, Councilmembers Capitelli, Droste, Maio and Wengraf.

The Council majority then voted to delay any action until a special meeting on November 10, 2015.  There, instead of discussing the Commission’s proposal, Capitelli presented a totally new, much weaker proposal after public comment was closed. This proposal would have delayed the $15 minimum wage for all employees in Berkeley until 2020.  The Labor Commission proposal was abandoned and Capitelli’s proposal later just faded away as well.

During that year activists were not sitting on their hands.  They had seen how delays had effectively led to missing the deadline for taking an initiative to the voters.

A community-labor coalition, the core of Berkeley for Working Families, had early-on formed to work in parallel to craft a citizen’s initiative.  Encouraged by the powerful national fight for $15 and the support from local low wage workers, Berkeley activists persisted in crafting a ballot measure.  Wendy Bloom, Mike Donaldson, David Fielder, Steve Gilbert, Matt Lewis, Ned Pearlstein, Judy Shattuck and others, with funding and legal support from SEIU 1021, drafted the measure and tried to negotiate with each of the City Council majority members.   In November 2015, when the Council refused even to discuss the Commission’s proposal, they were ready.  The coalition filed an initiative and gathered 4,400 signatures to qualify what is now officially named measure CC.

Dueling Ballot Initiatives

Measure CC would have raised the minimum wage to $15 in 2017 and, through modest annual increases, gradually caught up with the city’s official Living Wage ($16.81 in today’s dollars). It would also improve sick leave requirements, enhance enforcement, and phase out any exemptions – so all workers would be protected

The Council majority placed its own initiative on the ballot, delaying the increase to $15 to October 2019, well behind San Francisco, Emeryville, Mountain View and El Cerrito. Their measure, Measure BB, would also allow employers who provide health benefits to pay only $13.50 an hour, mandate less sick leave than what other cities require, and allow private employers to pay a sub-minimum “training” wage to those under 22. And BB contained a poison pill: it required a two thirds super majority of the Council to enact further increases or make other improvements.

Despite this negative response, Berkeley for Working Families exhausted all efforts to secure a better deal for working families.  After weeks of frustrating negotiations, they thought an acceptable solution was at hand. Capitelli agreed to call a special meeting of the City Council on August 11 but at the very last minute again reneged, issued a statement through the Downtown Business Association and did not show up to his own meeting.

That would have been the end of it but other elected officials, notably EBMUD director Andy Katz and former Assembly member Nancy Skinner, made a final effort resulting in an agreement not very different from the one rejected several weeks earlier, including a $15 minimum wage in 2018.

After Council passed the ordinance, Berkeley for Working Families issued the following statements. The proponents of both initiatives have agreed to call for a “No” vote on both as it is too late to remove them from the ballot:

As the coalition that drafted Measure CC and gathered 4,400 signatures to get it on the Ballot, we are pleased with the agreement passed by Council today … We would not have gotten to this point without the powerful national fight by fast food and other low wage workers for $15 an hour … [and] the years of effort from community activists, Labor and of course Council members Jesse Arreguin, Max Anderson and Kriss Worthington, who have been consistent champions for working families in Berkeley… the ordinance passed today … will help thousands of low wage workers immediately [and] be one of the most progressive minimum wage laws in the nation …  This November we will be asking voters to support this legislation by voting No on Measures BB and CC. [4]

Prepared by Rob Wrenn & Kate Harrison

Berkeley Progressive Alliance  –  PO Box 2961, Berkeley, CA 94702  – http://berkeleyprogressivealliance.org

Please click HERE to become a member of Berkeley Progressive Alliance

Join us on Facebook 

More on the Minimum Wage

For research related to impacts of raising the minimum wage in San Francisco and Oakland, check out:

 Impact of Minimum Wage on Three Cities

San Francisco Proposed City Minimum Wage Law – A Prospective Impact Study

The Impact of Oakland’s Proposed Minimum Wage Law- A Prospective Study

[1] http://www.ci.berkeley.ca.us/Clerk/City_Council/2013/04Apr/City_Council__04-30-2013_-__Regular_Meeting_Annotated_Agenda.aspx

[2] Larger businesses employing 50 or more employees or franchises would pay the city’s living wage.

[3] With increases of 55 cents an hour for small business on top of the CPI-based inflation adjustments.

[4] The language opposing BB and CC is signed by the Labor Council, the Chamber of Commerce, Berkeley for Working Families, and mayoral candidates Jesse Arreguin and Laurie Capitelli. See:

http://www.ci.berkeley.ca.us/Clerk/Elections/Election__2016_Ballot_Measures_Page.aspx.

 

 

 

 

Quick Links to our Progressive Candidates Websites

Our progressive Candidates need your donations and support. Click the links below to go to candidates websites and support their campaigns

Our Progressive candidates have raised significant amount of funds, but this election year is very competitive, as there is an opportunity to elect a progressive majority. Your contributions of money and time are very important. We urge you to DONATE to their campaigns, WALK IN THE NEIGHBORHOODS & CALL VOTERSCLICK THE LINKS ON CANDIDATES NAMES, BELOW, TO GET REACH THEIR WEBSITES. 

MAYOR: Jesse Arreguín

CITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 2: Nanci Armstrong-Temple

CITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 3: Ben Bartlett

CITY COUNCIL DISTRICT 5: Sophie Hahn

CITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 6: Fred Dodsworth 

THE PRO-RENT CONTROL RENT BOARD CANDIDATES, Christina Murphy, Leah Simon-Weisberg, Alejandro Soto-Vigil, Igor Tregub

ICYMI: Bernie Sanders has endorsed Jesse Arreguin for Mayor

Bernie has also endorsed the entire CALI Rent Board slate! Sanders is only endorsing in 100 local races around the country. Jesse has been a leader on the Council for the $15 minimum wage, one of Bernie’s major campaign issues and he and the Rent Board candidates support housing policies that address growing economic inequality and that preserve and increase the supply of safe, affordable housing in Berkeley.

VOTE for the CALI slate

Christina Murphy
Alejandro Soto-Vigil
Leah Simon-Weisberg
Igor Tregub
jesse-and-rent-board
Left to Right: Alejandro Soto-Vigil, Leah Simon-Weisberg, Jesse Arreguin, Christina Murphy and Igor Tregub

Submitted by Rob Wrenn

Berkeley Progressive Alliance  –  PO Box 2961, Berkeley, CA 94702  – http://berkeleyprogressivealliance.org

Please click HERE to become a member of Berkeley Progressive Alliance

Join us on Facebook 

How Berkeley’s Minimum Wage Increase was Won – Progressives and Community Activists Lead the Way

Faced with a citizen ballot measure on November’s ballot, on August 31, the Berkeley City Council unanimously voted for a compromise proposal to increase the minimum wage in Berkeley to $15 an hour on October 1, 2018.

Progressive Councilmember and mayoral candidate Jesse Arreguin has been  a leader in the effort to raise the minimum wage. In 2013, he was one of the sponsors of the Council item that referred increasing the minimum wage to the Labor Commission.

Jesse’s opponent for mayor, Laurie Capitelli, delayed action to achieve the $15 wage. In May 2014, he reneged on promises made to community activists who have worked tirelessly for a higher minimum wage.  In September, 2015 he again voted against a proposal to raise the minimum wage to $15 in 2018, while Jesse Arreguin and progressives on the Council voted for it. This year, he supported an alternative ballot measure that would have delayed the increase to $15 and added loopholes and exceptions. Finally, when it was too late to take the competing measures off the ballot, he and his council allies decided to join progressives on the council and action was finally taken to bring the minimum wage to $15.

Berkeley is now one of four Bay Area cities that will achieve the $15 minimum wage for all employees, regardless of the size of the business, in 2018 (others are Mountain View, San Francisco and Emeryville) with El Cerrito right behind in January, 2019.  The ordinance mandates sick leave, with a cap of 48 hours for employers of fewer than 25 workers and 72 hours from larger employers, starting right away.

As a result, BPA has withdrawn its support for Measure CC, the citizen measure. We urge a NO vote on both BB and CC.

For a more detailed account of the fight for the $15 minimum wage, click here.

Prepared by Rob Wrenn & Kate Harrison

Berkeley Progressive Alliance  –  PO Box 2961, Berkeley, CA 94702  – http://berkeleyprogressivealliance.org

Please click HERE to become a member of Berkeley Progressive Alliance

Join us on Facebook 

Help Elect a progressive majority to the Berkeley City Council

These candidates have been endorsed by Berkeley Progressive Alliance, Berkeley Citizens Action and Berkeley Tenants Union, during two endorsement events in April 2016;Details of the voter count for Mayor and council candidates for April 30th can be found here. They were all also recently endorsed by the Wellstone Democratic Club.

Our Progressive candidates have raised significant amount of funds, but this election year is very competitive, as there is an opportunity to elect a progressive majority. Your contributions of money and time are very important. We urge you to DONATE to their campaigns, WALK IN THE NEIGHBORHOODS & CALL VOTERSCLICK THE LINKS ON CANDIDATES NAMES, BELOW, TO GET REACH THEIR WEBSITES. 

evoi1008district4

MAYOR: Jesse Arreguín. As mayor, “Jesse will bring our city together and get results, so Berkeley moves forward and carries on our tradition of progressive leadership.” A current Councilmember, Jesse has progressive vision and a record to back it up. As Mayor, he will work to tackle the affordability crisis by protecting and expanding affordable housing and preventing displacement, so Berkeley remains a diverse and vibrant place to live.

NanciCITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 2: Nanci Armstrong-Temple, is committed to two things: Berkeley and Justice. She plans to fight for these as Berkeley City Council representative for District 2.” Nanci understands the unique landscape that makes up our small town, which is both diverse and complex. She believes that every resident of Berkeley has the right to experience a safe and equitable Berkeley, as well as responsive and ethical leadership.

BenCITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 3: Ben Bartlettsays his “campaign is about responsive governmentinclusion, and environmental sustainability… Berkeley, like most places, has a growing gap between Opportunity and Affordability, and a deepening conflict between Prosperity and Sustainability. These are the issues of our times.”

 

sophieCITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 5: Sophie Hahn, active in Berkeley since High School, Sophie’s “commitment to this community, and to causes that exemplify core Berkeley values, has been expressed through continuous leadership, advocacy and service.” As a member of the Zoning Adjustment Board, Sophie has been “the leading advocate for affordable housing and sensitivity to neighborhood concerns.”

FREDCITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 6: Fred Dodswortha Berkeley resident since the mid-seventies, a journalist, teacher and former business owner with a lifelong commitment to the environment and social justice issues, Fred’s an independent candidate who will speak truth to power. Fred supports a living wage and affordable housing, will work to save Alta Bates and Herrick Hospitals, create real solutions to the homeless and mental health in our community and develop responsible transparent budgets.

THE PRO-RENT CONTROL RENT BOARD CANDIDATES

On Sunday, April 26th, the 2016 Berkeley Tenants Convention endorsed the following candidates for a Pro-Tenant Slate for Rent BoardChristina Murphy, Leah Simon-Weisberg, Alejandro Soto-Vigil, Igor Tregub. Check back here for links to websites. CALI

How Berkeley Voted: 2016 June Primary Election

June 24, 2016                                                                         by Rob Wrenn

Bernie won Berkeley!

Photography Intern

Bernie Sanders won Berkeley in the Democratic presidential primary with 54.4% of the vote to 45.2% for Hillary Clinton, not a huge margin. Clinton did best in the City’s wealthiest areas, the northeast Berkeley hills in District 6, in the hills above Claremont Ave. in District 8, and in the windy street precincts in the northern part of District 5. These areas have historically favored “moderate” candidates in local Berkeley election.

Sanders swept the flatlands, except for two precincts in District 1, winning South Berkeley, West Berkeley and the central part of the city and sweeping the areas near the UC campus, Southside, Northside and Downtown by large margins. He did well in the areas where progressive candidates usually fare well in local elections.

Results by city and precinct:

Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 7.42.36 PM.pngNote: Student precincts consists of precincts in the area south of campus between Dwight Way and campus and 1 consolidated precinct on the near Northside, that includes the Foothill dorm. Berkeley results include write-ins; Oakland, Albany and Emeryville and county results are based only on vote for candidates on the ballot.

Turnout

Turnout Turnout in Berkeley was up this year compared to the uncontested 2012 California Democratic presidential primary, but was down compared to 2008 when Clinton ran against Obama for the nomination. In that hotly contested 2008 Democratic Presidential primary, which took place in February that year, turnout was 64.5% in Berkeley, with Obama defeating Clinton by a huge margin: 27,352 to 11,505. This year turnout was 58.0%.

Student turnout was very low, which is not surprising given that the primary took place after most undergraduates had left town for the summer. No doubt some students opted to register and vote in the hometowns they returned to when the semester ended.

This year, 833,803 people were registered to vote in Alameda County, and 49.3%, turned out to vote countywide. Of 480,475 registered Democrats in the county 59% voted. In addition, a little over table 140,000 Decline to State (DTS) voters cast Democratic ballots.

In Berkeley, 45,933 ballots were cast. In the 2014 November gubernatorial election, 40,301 votes were cast by Berkeley voters. 47,303 voted in the presidential primary election in 2008. A record 66,703 votes were cast in the 2008 November presidential election.

Turnout may have been dampened by media reports before the election that declared that Clinton had enough delegates, with super delegates included, to secure the nomination.

Turnout in Berkeley, Selected Elections, 2008-2016

Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 7.46.55 PM

Trump gets less than 1% in Berkeley

The vast majority of the Berkeley voters’ ballots cast, 42,476, were cast in the Democratic primary. Donald Trump received 454 votes in the Republican primary; Kasich got 306. So Trump was supported by slightly less than 1% of the voters who cast ballots in Berkeley.

9th State Senate District

Former Assemblymember and District 1 councilmember Nancy Skinner easily beat Sandré Swanson in Berkeley, crushing him with 24,130 votes (62.6%) to Swanson’s 9596 votes(24.9% ). Other candidates got 4799 votes. Skinner swept every district in Berkeley. In the Oakland portion of the 9th District, Skinner beat Swanson by a much narrower margin of 44,012 to 40,650. Skinner and Swanson will face each other again in November.

Contra Costa County had not finished counting ballots as of June 22, but the 9th district result to date, including votes reported so far in Contra Costa County portions of the district is 48.0% for Skinner and 30.6% for Swanson.

New BPA flyer available

BPA flyer for screen views

This version is meant for screen views.

 

BPAFlierFront.cwk (WP)        BPAFlierBack.cwk (WP)

This version is meant for printing multiple copies, 2 up on a letter size sheet.

For questions email us at: berkeleyprogressivealliance@gmail.com

 

Results of Endorsement Meeting held by BPA- BCA-BTU on Saturday April 30th

Endorsement Results:

Mayor: Jesse Arreguin               District 2: Nanci Armstrong-Temple

District 3: Ben Bartlett                District 5: Sophie Hahn

District 6: Fred Dodsworth

 

Mayor: 109 valid ballots counted, one invalid. Jesse Arreguin achieved 60% threshhold on first round of rank choice counting

Jesse Arreguin 65%                         Kriss Worthington 24%

Mike Lee: 4%                                     Ben Gould: 3%

Write ins: 2 for Kate Harrison, 1 for Moni Law                                      No endorsement: 2%

Total votes for Jesse Arreguin for 1st, 2nd or 3rd choice: 97. Total votes for Kriss Worthington for 1st, 2nd or 3rd choice: 74

 

District 2 City Council – 98 valid ballots. Nanci Armstrong-Temple achieved 61% after ranked choices were counted

Nanci Armstrong-Temple: 61%          Cheryl Davila: 26%                      No Endorsement    13%

 

District 3 City Council – 103 valid ballots  (3 invalid ballots): Endorsement goes to Ben Bartlett, who achieved 87% on first round of rank choice counting

Ben Bartlett: 87%                                      Mark Coplan: 12%                      Deborah Matthews: 1%     No endorsement   0

 

District 5 City Council – 85 Valid ballots: Sophie Hahn achieved 78.9% on first round of rank choice counting

Sophie Hahn 91%                                   Stephen Murphy: 6%                    No endorsement: 2%

 

District 6 City Council – 94 valid ballots, 2 invalid: Fred Dodsworth achieved 78.9% on first round of rank choice counting

Fred Dodsworth: 78%                                  Isabelle Gaston: 9%                 Susan Wengraf: 5%         No Endorsement: 9%